More on Laser Projectors, images this time

June 15, 2005

laser projection

Ok I bet some of you thought I had a screw loose with all this talk of “Laser Video Projectors” lately, but hopefully pictures like the one above will put things into a little better perspective, i.e. this technology is capable of some really impressive images.

The projected image above was created with equipment from C.O.L.O.R or the “Corporation for Laser Optics Research“. The projected resolution is 1920 x 1080 and the ‘Projector’ has a real world contrast ratio of 4000:1. This is bleeding edge technology today, but one day it’ll likely be as common as a 52” DLP.



Posted by Bryan Greenway | | Filed Under Home Theater Projectors


Comments

  • alok kumar

    how does this work for a full screen movie display in a normal theatre . and is it too costly? what does it cost? can a digital intermediate be used for laser projection?
    what resolution can be achieved?better than 4k?
    what will be the cinematography method to realise laser projection?if it is reasonable can one hope to partner in marketing the technology?excuse my innocence im new to the concept .but it stirs a curiosity.

  • alok kumar

    how does this work for a full screen movie display in a normal theatre . and is it too costly? what does it cost? can a digital intermediate be used for laser projection?
    what resolution can be achieved?better than 4k?
    what will be the cinematography method to realise laser projection?if it is reasonable can one hope to partner in marketing the technology?excuse my innocence im new to the concept .but it stirs a curiosity.

  • B.Greenway

    Unsure on the mirror part, but definitely using lasers.

  • B.Greenway

    Unsure on the mirror part, but definitely using lasers.

  • Kevin

    Was this done using DLP-like mirrors, or were they using Sony’s GLV technology? (If I recall, the main drawback to GLV was that it had to use lasers rather than white light.)

  • Kevin

    Was this done using DLP-like mirrors, or were they using Sony’s GLV technology? (If I recall, the main drawback to GLV was that it had to use lasers rather than white light.)