How to: Wall mounting a LCD or Plasma

May 29, 2006

panasonic on wallOver the weekend I helped a friend wall mount a Panasonic LCD and thought to myself, hey why not take a few pictures and post an illustrated how-to guide on this. I think it turned out quite nicely here are some before and after shots.

Before you tackle wall mounting a LCD or plasma, you need to ask yourself one question. Is this something best left to a professional installer? If you’re not sure then the answer is yes. I’m not implying that self installation is for everyone.

If you doubt your abilities then by all means it’s worth hiring a professional. However if your reasonably competent with minor home improvement tasks and follow my instructions carefully, this shouldn’t offer you much trouble at all.

So here is my step-by-step guide that illustrates how I install flat-panel displays. With the right preparation, just about any competent do-it your-selfer can accomplish similar installs, in as little as an hour or so.

Picking the right location: Choosing the right place (read wall) to wall mount your LCD or Plasma in my opinion is directly proportional to the difficulty you’ll experience. Exterior walls typically offer more obstructions than interior walls, and if at all possible (especially if you’ve never done this) I recommend using interior walls.

Exterior walls, depending on the region you live in, may (or may not) be built with sway-braces which are sometimes called fire-blocks; although true fire-blocks are typically only found in commercial structures. These horizontal braces or blocks are generally found about mid ways up the wall from the floor, and greatly increase the difficulty of passing the wiring from your equipment up to the display.

Note: choosing an interior wall doesn’t 100% rule out any obstruction in the wall but I have a recommendation for checking this as well, more on that later.

Preparation: First make sure that your chosen LCD or plasma is even capable of being wall-mounted. It’s rare but there are some early models that were table-top only. The easiest way to check this is to see if the box or owners manual mentions ‘VESA Compatible’ or just the words VESA mount. VESA stands for “Video Electronics Standards Association” and is just another way of saying this display is designed to work with VESA standard mounts.

If you don’t see any mention of this, all isn’t lost. Just look at the back of the display and check to see if it has four (or more) threaded screw inserts that a mount can be affixed to. If so, you’re good to go. OmniMountFrom there you’ll need to select a mount that’s appropriate for your display. Wall mounts come in a wide range of sizes and styles. For brevity’s sake I’ll just mention the ones I prefer but by all means shop around for what best suits your application.

We pretty much stick with two brands of display mounts, namely OmniMount and Peerless. For LCD’s 37” and under I typically go for the OmniMount and switch-off to Peerless only when I need to mount something heavier than the average 42” Plasma. If these mounts are out of your budget, you should also check out the TV wall mounts at Armor Mount they’re highly recommended as well.

Much of this is just personal habit and not written in stone, since all these manufacturers make excellent mounts and will work just fine in a large range of applications. One last thing to consider in a wall mount is tilt. Tilt wall mounts allow you to tilt the display down slightly, this is a nice feature and one I recommend opting for if possible.

Tools Needed: Most flat panel displays can be wall-mounted with tools you likely already own, that is if you own basic hand-tools (tape measure, screwdrivers, a socket set, cordless drill etc). One item you might not own, that can come in handy for pinpointing the exact location for the mount, is a stud finder (about $20 at Home Depot or Lowe’s).

Recommended tools: Tape Measure, Socket set, Torpedo Level, Sheetrock Saw, Electrical Tape, Stud-Finder, Philips Screw Driver and of course the LCD/Plasma and wall mount, as well as the proper cabling.

First Steps: You’ll need to determine the horizontal placement of the mount on your wall. Once you have a rough idea where you want to place the display (left to right) you’ll need to check for obstructions below the mount down to where your power cable and video feeds will exit the wall, and ultimately make their way to your source equipment. This is where the stud finder comes in handy.

prepAlso in the above step, locate the wall-studs as they relate in position to your bracket. At the very minimum you’ll want to ensure your penetrating into at least one wall-stud (with two anchor bolts, top & bottom) if your mounting a LCD. If you’re mounting a plasma, you’ll want to hit two studs with two anchors bolts on each side, i.e. a total of four anchors.

Note: While it is acceptable to bear the weight of a small to medium sized LCD on one stud, that doesn’t mean you can leave the opposite side loose or free. You’ll still need to toggle or anchor the opposite side, most wall-mount kits come with the necessary hardware for this.

About screen height: As you can see in the photo links at the top of the page, this particular screen is positioned somewhat high on the wall, something I try to avoid if at all possible. Our reasoning for placing this LCD high on the wall was the four poster bed in this room, any lower and the view would have been obstructed by the lower left bed post.

A quick note about the aforementioned power cable: There are several methods of getting power to your wall mounted display but not all of them are condoned by the National Electric Code. The preferred method is to employ standard ‘romex’ electrical cable terminated inside a clock-box style receptacle.

This article is geared toward do-it your-self minded individuals with at least a precursory knowledge of home electrical systems. Please use discretion and by all means consult an electrician if in doubt.

back

Installing the Mount: Before you begin mounting the bracket to the wall, you’ll want to attach the mounting rails to the back of your display. I like to do this first so I can get a better idea of exactly where the display will sit in relation to the bracket on the wall. In other words, if the rails that affix to the rear of the display shift the overall height of the display up by two inches, you’ll need to factor this into where you mount the wall bracket.

Once this is done you’re almost ready to install the mount to the wall. Grab a pencil and make some light marks on the wall, where the anchor bolts will go through the mount and also trace out a pattern where your wall-box (for cabling) will be cut.

Then put the mount aside for a minute. You’ll want to tap or pre-start a pilot hole for your anchor bolts as they can be difficult to start on their own. You can use a cordless drill with small diameter bit for this or by driving in a sheetrock screw and then removing it.

Go ahead and cut-out and install your wall-boxes for the cabling, both at the display location and wherever you want the audio/video cables to interface with your A/V system. This is where the recommended sheetrock saw comes into play but you could probably improvise here with a box-cutter.

If you’re exiting the cables directly below the display (at electrical box height), the actual pulling of the cables will be much easier than if you’re trying to reach another location in the room, by going into the crawlspace or basement and back up into the room.

mount

If the wall your installing the display on is insulated you might find it difficult to get the cables from the wall-box behind the mount down to the box near your equipment. We use a fish-tape for these types of wire pulls, but you could probably substitute two straightened coat hangers, taped together for this as well.

Ok, with your wall-boxes in place and cabling ran you’re ready to attach the mount to the wall. Hold the mount up to the wall and with your torpedo level ensure that its level and in your desired position.

With a socket-wrench secure your first anchor; this may take a bit a pressure to get the bolt started depending on how well you tapped your pilot hole. Move onto the second bolt, third, fourth and give them all a good last twist to ensure they’re snug and you’re ready to hang the display.

As you can see in the photo above, we chose to exit our cables above the mount. We typically exit the cables in the large open rectangular area in the center of the mount, but as this particular LCD’s inputs are located toward the top-half of the display we accommodated for this with the higher cable placement.

Hanging your display: Before you grab that new television you might want to get a family member or friend to help you with this part. It’s definitely easier to hang a display with two people, one on each side than trying to wrangle it into position all by yourself, (especially if it’s a 42” Plasma, don’t try to hang something this heavy by yourself).

I also recommend taking a look at where the inputs for power and video are located on the back of the display before you lift it. It’s much easier to put the cables into their respective slots if you already know where they go.

Once the display is mounted and the cables are all in place, check to make sure the safety tabs are in position. The weight of the display itself will likely keep it secure on the mount but these tabs or “locks” that close over the rails of the mount, add the extra piece of mind you want when it comes to expensive LCD’s or Plasmas.

Final

Final Thoughts: So there you have it, your LCD or Plasma is wall mounted and ready to enjoy and you’ll be able to tell your friends and family ‘Yeah I installed that, it was a piece of cake’.

My goal here was to illustrate the types of things you may encounter while wall-mounting a LCD or plasma, to help you get a better idea if this is even something you want to tackle yourself.

As with any A/V project, specific applications and installation methods can give rise to unforeseen problems, but hopefully at the very least you now have a better understanding of what goes into the process.

I want to make a quick note about cabling. In my photos you’ll see that we only ran a HDMI cable. We didn’t have any component sources that were going to be used in this system, as the receiver that interfaces with this disply will handle all video switching via HDMI. In most cases however I also recommend running a set of component cables, especially if you’re in doubt as to the final system configuration.



Posted by Bryan Greenway | | Filed Under Home Theater How-to


Comments

  • Ymmatboy

    just got this flat tv from my friend , i have just bought mounting bracket, what is usually the size of screw that attaches the mounting bracket at the back of the tv.
    thanks

  • Pewusmc

    Ok…stressing I wont do it right and not be able to hide wiring. How much should it be to have someone do it and move the outlet up from the same wall?

  • Jaguarblues3

    i want to hang two tv's side by side, is there an optimum distance between them?

  • immy

    How do i hide my cables for my lcd tv?I am planning on having it above my fire.It will be located on a brick wall. I dnt want the easier option of buying cable consealments.

  • bruce smith

    I am going to hang a 40 inch lcd tv, that weighs only 37 #s. The directions call for 4 swag bolt to mount the omni mount. My studs are such that the mount will not be centered on wall to accommodate four bolts. I am thinking about using only two bolts in the center of the mount, drilled into the studs, and four other screws on the four corners of mount, drilled into 1″ cypress boards to support the mount. Do you think the unit will be secure enough with this plan?

  • cocdawg

    I'm installing a 32″ in both of my boys rooms and only have one option as far as placement. On this short wall there are two studs but I can't use them b/c the tv will be hanging over the closet on one side or the entrance on the other. How do I hang these tv's without a stud?

  • marylr

    what size screws to you use on the mounting brackets (that go on the back of the Tv)? Mary

  • cj

    I have a 09 Panasonic flat screen 42″, will a universal tilt wall mount work or do I have to purchase a Panasonic wall mount kit?

  • Neil

    What if you don't have studs in the wall and the 2″ insulation
    is just bolted to the wall??
    I want to hang A 37 ” plasma!!

  • cuillin1

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKR3KifUBMI

    Easiest way to mount a plamsa

  • bgreenway
  • LAWMAN1900

    Where do you put your cable box at?

  • Anonymous

    Matt, just the typical hit two studs if it all possible, that’s the important part.

  • Anonymous

    Bob, that’s not all that uncommon, nothing to worry about.

  • mattd10

    Thanks for all the helpful tips. This really helped me to grasp the ideas and concepts prior to getting started. I will be hanging a 52 inch. My goal is to hang it it above a gas fireplace in the center of the room. I assume that is possible if I can locate something to anchor it to. Is that accurate? Is there anything that I need to be carefulof or any advice or suggestions prior to mounting?

    Thanks for any input!

  • Bob

    Just bought a 52″ LCD. I am about to buy the wall mount but noticed the hole mounts in the back of the tv are sunk in about 1/4″ which means the bracket will be bolted against the back plastic. Which means all the back pressure is on the plastic case. I hope this makes sence. In other words the bolt will go through the bracket to the metal threaded tv screw hole but because the hole is sunk in all the tightening pressure will be against the back plastic case.
    Thanks Bob

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for all your good advise and guide, it helped a lot, i did the electrical work with in no time, only thing i was hasitate about was how to install the darn thing, but your step by step guide made it a piece of cake.
    Thanks once again, i mounted 2 tv the same day now everybody loves it.

  • Anonymous

    Hi “Name”

    Our local building code doesn’t require plenum rated cable in residential dwellings. Getting into the various state and county codes is far beyond the scope of this article, but by all means keep the NEC and various building codes in-mind when running cabling.

  • Name

    I see that you have an HDMI cord coming from the wall. Is it plenum? I didn’t see you touch a bit on plenum wiring and how it’s sometimes mandatory in homes. Would you add that type of info to your article please?

  • Anonymous
  • Anonymous

    Scott, LCD’s are relatively light, I wouldn’t worry too much if you only hit one stud, just anchor it on the other side with some sheetrock anchors and you’ll be fine.

  • Scott

    I was working on installing a 52″ LCD in a 60 year old home. I found one stud to pre-tap but going across starting at 16″ all the way out to the width of the mount about 28 ” I found no second stud. What could I do in that case?

  • Christina

    What do you do with all of your satellite boxes and wires if you mount a tv on the wall?

  • B.Greenway

    Eric, I wouldn’t, especially with an articulating mount. Can you span the two studs with something and then attach the mount to that?

  • B.Greenway

    Eric, I wouldn’t, especially with an articulating mount. Can you span the two studs with something and then attach the mount to that?

  • Eric

    I purchased a wall mount with an articulating arm for a 40 inch LCD. My problem is that the wall that I want to mount the TV to has studs that are 2 ft apart. Is it possible to mount that type of wall mount without studs?

  • Eric

    I purchased a wall mount with an articulating arm for a 40 inch LCD. My problem is that the wall that I want to mount the TV to has studs that are 2 ft apart. Is it possible to mount that type of wall mount without studs?

  • B.Greenway

    Jim I’m sure something like that exists, I just cant think of who to check first, drawing a blank atm. Peerless mounts might be a possibility however.

  • B.Greenway

    Jim I’m sure something like that exists, I just cant think of who to check first, drawing a blank atm. Peerless mounts might be a possibility however.

  • Jim

    I would like to mount a large 50″+ lcd or plasma screen in front of a closet type opening in wall so I may swing it open and get to the area in back of the screen. I.e., a side mount or hinge type. Picture the way a door swings on its hinge.
    Is there a way to do this already out there or do I have to modify something?
    Thanks,
    Jim

  • Jim

    I would like to mount a large 50″+ lcd or plasma screen in front of a closet type opening in wall so I may swing it open and get to the area in back of the screen. I.e., a side mount or hinge type. Picture the way a door swings on its hinge.
    Is there a way to do this already out there or do I have to modify something?
    Thanks,
    Jim

  • B.Greenway

    Lisa, I wouldn’t worry about that too much but a little common sense goes a long way here. First off with the fire place on/lit/running (I don’t know if its wood/gas/electric) walk up and place your hand in the area directly above it, is it hot to the touch? If so don’t mount it there. Also an oven thermometer can give you a more accurate reading, if that temperature is above the manufacturers operating threshold in the owners manual, don’t mount it there.

    However in my experience the nominal temperature above fireplaces generally never reaches temperatures that would worry me about mounting a display above them, but again use caution. Even if the area in question is only slightly above the manufacturers recommended temperature threshold, it can cut the displays life expectancy in half. In short I don’t have a one-size-fits-all answer for you as fireplaces can vary wildly in how much ambient heat they put out.

  • B.Greenway

    Lisa, I wouldn’t worry about that too much but a little common sense goes a long way here. First off with the fire place on/lit/running (I don’t know if its wood/gas/electric) walk up and place your hand in the area directly above it, is it hot to the touch? If so don’t mount it there. Also an oven thermometer can give you a more accurate reading, if that temperature is above the manufacturers operating threshold in the owners manual, don’t mount it there.

    However in my experience the nominal temperature above fireplaces generally never reaches temperatures that would worry me about mounting a display above them, but again use caution. Even if the area in question is only slightly above the manufacturers recommended temperature threshold, it can cut the displays life expectancy in half. In short I don’t have a one-size-fits-all answer for you as fireplaces can vary wildly in how much ambient heat they put out.

  • lisa

    Do you know if there are issues with placing my new lcd on the fire place wall above my fire?
    there is a mantel piece between them but have heard rumors that this can damage the Tv although can find no evidence?
    lisa

  • lisa

    Do you know if there are issues with placing my new lcd on the fire place wall above my fire?
    there is a mantel piece between them but have heard rumors that this can damage the Tv although can find no evidence?
    lisa

  • Rob G.

    Read your response re: surge suppression above … any advice or reccommendations for brands of devices? Also, when you say it “lies flat behind the display” – do you mean that you just plug it into the receptical and it sits right on your wall-mount bracket behind the TV? Sorry for not quite understanding! :-)

  • Rob G.

    Read your response re: surge suppression above … any advice or reccommendations for brands of devices? Also, when you say it “lies flat behind the display” – do you mean that you just plug it into the receptical and it sits right on your wall-mount bracket behind the TV? Sorry for not quite understanding! :-)

  • manna

    I am planning to wall mount a 42″ LCD above my fireplace,cause that is the most suitable place in my living room.But the problem is,I can not find any stud using stud sensor,just drywall.Is it normal for this particular place? If so,is there any way I can carry out my plan?

  • manna

    I am planning to wall mount a 42″ LCD above my fireplace,cause that is the most suitable place in my living room.But the problem is,I can not find any stud using stud sensor,just drywall.Is it normal for this particular place? If so,is there any way I can carry out my plan?

  • C.Wilson

    I will be sitting prob. 12 ft away from where my new plasma will be mounted. With your experience, do you think mounting the bottom of the plasma at eye level would be acceptable? To low would look terrible and like you said, too high would hurt your neck. Thanks for the help.

  • C.Wilson

    I will be sitting prob. 12 ft away from where my new plasma will be mounted. With your experience, do you think mounting the bottom of the plasma at eye level would be acceptable? To low would look terrible and like you said, too high would hurt your neck. Thanks for the help.

  • B.Greenway

    Alex, Technically all cables run through interior walls should be UL rated, I believe however there’s a conduit provision for this. The National Electrical Code Handbook should encompass all of that information.

  • B.Greenway

    Alex, Technically all cables run through interior walls should be UL rated, I believe however there’s a conduit provision for this. The National Electrical Code Handbook should encompass all of that information.

  • Alex

    Leaving the issue of the power cable aside, can you shead any insight on what cables can and can’t be run through the wall. I understand that most HDMI cables should not be run through the wall. Only UL rated cables. What about component cables? Should they be UL rated too?

  • Alex

    Leaving the issue of the power cable aside, can you shead any insight on what cables can and can’t be run through the wall. I understand that most HDMI cables should not be run through the wall. Only UL rated cables. What about component cables? Should they be UL rated too?

  • Wes

    Well done. Congrats on the plug in Popular Science. I couldn’t resist the visit after seeing you in it. Cheers!

  • Wes

    Well done. Congrats on the plug in Popular Science. I couldn’t resist the visit after seeing you in it. Cheers!

  • B.Greenway

    Hi Ken, first of all disregard your room height; the measurement from your seated position is much more relevant. Avoid placing the display at picture height, it may look good from an aesthetic standpoint but this can induce neck and eye strain.

    You don’t to want to sit on the couch and have to turn your head upwards to view the screen. I generally place the displays center slightly above the viewer’s line of sight while seated; this should give you best trade-off between comfortable viewing and real word functionality.

  • B.Greenway

    Hi Ken, first of all disregard your room height; the measurement from your seated position is much more relevant. Avoid placing the display at picture height, it may look good from an aesthetic standpoint but this can induce neck and eye strain.

    You don’t to want to sit on the couch and have to turn your head upwards to view the screen. I generally place the displays center slightly above the viewer’s line of sight while seated; this should give you best trade-off between comfortable viewing and real word functionality.

  • ken

    what is a standard height for a 50″ plasma in a 16′ foot room?

  • ken

    what is a standard height for a 50″ plasma in a 16′ foot room?

  • Del

    I’m installing an Omni mount fixed mount unit for my Sony KDL-46XBR2 LCD.
    I am not intending to run the cables in the wall.
    What are my other options?
    Other than stringing them down the wall for the world to see.

  • Del

    I’m installing an Omni mount fixed mount unit for my Sony KDL-46XBR2 LCD.
    I am not intending to run the cables in the wall.
    What are my other options?
    Other than stringing them down the wall for the world to see.

  • David MacDonald

    my wife and I just bought a 32″ LCD tv and apparently where it sits there is no stud directly behind the wall, I feel pretty good about doing home repairs and stuff but it will be a really tough sale to my wife to tear into the wall to add stud support, would have any other idea’s, maybe a recommend a bracket who’s mount is 16″ I dunno just looking for some other alternatives before I bring up the “adding studs” subject, it stinks because where we have TV it won’t work moving it to the right or left to make it fit on a stud.

    thanks

  • David MacDonald

    my wife and I just bought a 32″ LCD tv and apparently where it sits there is no stud directly behind the wall, I feel pretty good about doing home repairs and stuff but it will be a really tough sale to my wife to tear into the wall to add stud support, would have any other idea’s, maybe a recommend a bracket who’s mount is 16″ I dunno just looking for some other alternatives before I bring up the “adding studs” subject, it stinks because where we have TV it won’t work moving it to the right or left to make it fit on a stud.

    thanks

  • S Aguilar

    I just bought a new home and in this home the builder created a 3 1/2 inch inset above the fireplace. My 42 inch plasma is wider than than this inset. So even with the brace and hooks it cannot go deep enough into the inset to hook on the wall mount and too wide for the inset. I was thinking of buying a 3 inch thick piece of wood. I would then drill holes for 4 lag bolts to go throught the mount and then through the piece of wood and then into the studs behind the inset. What are your thoughts?

  • S Aguilar

    I just bought a new home and in this home the builder created a 3 1/2 inch inset above the fireplace. My 42 inch plasma is wider than than this inset. So even with the brace and hooks it cannot go deep enough into the inset to hook on the wall mount and too wide for the inset. I was thinking of buying a 3 inch thick piece of wood. I would then drill holes for 4 lag bolts to go throught the mount and then through the piece of wood and then into the studs behind the inset. What are your thoughts?

  • Mike

    Ok,

    Now this might sound totally crazy but I want to mount my plasma above my bed on the ceiling.(so I can lie in bed and watch it on my back. I know I might die if it falls on me but I think the shock value is worth it. I guess I need to know for sure if mounting it facing down if it will fail. Any idea or should I call a help line for the plasma I want to buy?

  • Mike

    Ok,

    Now this might sound totally crazy but I want to mount my plasma above my bed on the ceiling.(so I can lie in bed and watch it on my back. I know I might die if it falls on me but I think the shock value is worth it. I guess I need to know for sure if mounting it facing down if it will fail. Any idea or should I call a help line for the plasma I want to buy?

  • B.Greenway

    I generally mount them somewhere nearby, equipment rack, closet or such and run component cables and infrared repeater to it for control, that or an IR/RF remote.

  • B.Greenway

    I generally mount them somewhere nearby, equipment rack, closet or such and run component cables and infrared repeater to it for control, that or an IR/RF remote.

  • Philip

    So the question is…what do you do with your cable box?

  • Philip

    So the question is…what do you do with your cable box?

  • Joe

    Hi,

    Is it possible to put an LCD screen into the wall? so that the Screen is flush with the wall? It would have to be a small LCD to fit in between wall studs. Do you know of anyone attempting something like that?

    thanks,

    _Joe

  • Joe

    Hi,

    Is it possible to put an LCD screen into the wall? so that the Screen is flush with the wall? It would have to be a small LCD to fit in between wall studs. Do you know of anyone attempting something like that?

    thanks,

    _Joe

  • B.Greenway

    Kevin,

    Not a stupid question but don’t do it. Mounts are designed to distribute the weight evenly across two wall-studs. I promise you and your friend that wall-mounts aren’t some evil scheme by ‘the man,’ to separate you from more of your hard earned dollars

    Hanging something as heavy as a plasma on four screws will eventually pull those screws down and leave quite a mess in the floor, directly below where the plasma used to hang. I wouldn’t even do this with a light weight LCD, it’s just not worth it.

  • B.Greenway

    Kevin,

    Not a stupid question but don’t do it. Mounts are designed to distribute the weight evenly across two wall-studs. I promise you and your friend that wall-mounts aren’t some evil scheme by ‘the man,’ to separate you from more of your hard earned dollars

    Hanging something as heavy as a plasma on four screws will eventually pull those screws down and leave quite a mess in the floor, directly below where the plasma used to hang. I wouldn’t even do this with a light weight LCD, it’s just not worth it.

  • kevin

    I am having a debate with a friend who wants to mount plasma directly to the wall without a bracket. Now i am not familiar with plasma TV mounting neither am I particularly handy but I told him its not a good idea. can you hang a plasma on four screws screwed directly into the wall. Apologies if this is the stupidest question you have ever heard.

  • kevin

    I am having a debate with a friend who wants to mount plasma directly to the wall without a bracket. Now i am not familiar with plasma TV mounting neither am I particularly handy but I told him its not a good idea. can you hang a plasma on four screws screwed directly into the wall. Apologies if this is the stupidest question you have ever heard.

  • er-head

    wow, Brian, thanks for a great and descriptive post! This really helps me out a lot. I’ve never hung one, so I always wondered how the power got up there, but seeing it makes it obvious. I’ve run a few power boxes and changed out a few light switches, so I have basic knowledge, but this really unlocked it for me.

    Now I can do my next install with confidence, unless I’m able to splurge on that 70 incher after all. :D

    For those wondering why Brian didn’t give better description on running the lines, it’s because if you don’t already know how to run them, you probably shouldn’t be. Call an electrician. Seriously. None of us wants you to die. :)

  • er-head

    wow, Brian, thanks for a great and descriptive post! This really helps me out a lot. I’ve never hung one, so I always wondered how the power got up there, but seeing it makes it obvious. I’ve run a few power boxes and changed out a few light switches, so I have basic knowledge, but this really unlocked it for me.

    Now I can do my next install with confidence, unless I’m able to splurge on that 70 incher after all. :D

    For those wondering why Brian didn’t give better description on running the lines, it’s because if you don’t already know how to run them, you probably shouldn’t be. Call an electrician. Seriously. None of us wants you to die. :)

  • B.Greenway

    Chong, “but can never be too safe when it comes to electricity.”

    Which is why I wont be giving out any advice whatsoever, when it comes to high voltage wiring. It’s just not my area of expertise.

    Sorry, the best I can recommend is some of the do-it-yourself books at home depot or lowes.

  • B.Greenway

    Chong, “but can never be too safe when it comes to electricity.”

    Which is why I wont be giving out any advice whatsoever, when it comes to high voltage wiring. It’s just not my area of expertise.

    Sorry, the best I can recommend is some of the do-it-yourself books at home depot or lowes.

  • Chong

    I am going to be installing a plasma next week. The electrical outlet is about 2 feet from the group and i want to add an additional outlet behind the plasma. Can you explain how to do this? I already have a good idea but can never be too safe when it comes to electricity.

  • Chong

    I am going to be installing a plasma next week. The electrical outlet is about 2 feet from the group and i want to add an additional outlet behind the plasma. Can you explain how to do this? I already have a good idea but can never be too safe when it comes to electricity.

  • B.Greenway

    Hi Eric,

    I’m not sure where you’re getting some of these ideas, a clock box is just a receptacle, just like any other standard electrical receptacle in your home, the only difference is that they’re recessed slightly and (may) have a picture hook.

    Also not sure what you mean by “comercial power”. There’s nothing commercial about this entire project. All the equipment and wiring you see depicted in those photos use standard 115v residential electrical service.

    I say this because even mentioning the style of receptacle and the words commercial power, leads me to believe you may be under some inaccurate impressions about what’s depicted here.

    Actually there is plenty of room behind an install like this for a surge protector. We use corded surge protectors with the right angled wall-plugs, for these types of installs, it lies flat right behind the display. I didn’t show one here because the owner opted not to purchase one.

  • B.Greenway

    Hi Eric,

    I’m not sure where you’re getting some of these ideas, a clock box is just a receptacle, just like any other standard electrical receptacle in your home, the only difference is that they’re recessed slightly and (may) have a picture hook.

    Also not sure what you mean by “comercial power”. There’s nothing commercial about this entire project. All the equipment and wiring you see depicted in those photos use standard 115v residential electrical service.

    I say this because even mentioning the style of receptacle and the words commercial power, leads me to believe you may be under some inaccurate impressions about what’s depicted here.

    Actually there is plenty of room behind an install like this for a surge protector. We use corded surge protectors with the right angled wall-plugs, for these types of installs, it lies flat right behind the display. I didn’t show one here because the owner opted not to purchase one.

  • Eric Goodrich

    How did you address the issue of power surge suppression? If I am going to install a “clock” box for my 40″ LCD I really don’t want to plug it into comercial power and trust the power god’s not to hurt my investment. ;-)
    I don’t think there is enough room behind the display for a good surge suppressor. Perhaps a whole house surge suppressor?

    ~e

  • Eric Goodrich

    How did you address the issue of power surge suppression? If I am going to install a “clock” box for my 40″ LCD I really don’t want to plug it into comercial power and trust the power god’s not to hurt my investment. ;-)
    I don’t think there is enough room behind the display for a good surge suppressor. Perhaps a whole house surge suppressor?

    ~e

  • B.Greenway

    Hey Stan, yes many manufacturers make mounts like that. Take a look at:

    sanus.com peerlessindustries.com and womnimount.com/consumer/

    Specifically the cantilever or articulating arm style mounts

  • B.Greenway

    Hey Stan, yes many manufacturers make mounts like that. Take a look at:

    sanus.com peerlessindustries.com and womnimount.com/consumer/

    Specifically the cantilever or articulating arm style mounts

  • B.Greenway

    Des,

    Construction types/materials and locations can all affect what you’ll encounter when you start trying to retro-fit wiring into an existing home. All I can really say in the space I have here, is to be sure what’s behind your walls before you start drilling or cutting into them.

    Preparation is key, determine if you have sway braces or not, use the construction of your home to your advantage, does it have an unfinished basement? If so bringing the wires up from the basement might be the best option, have a finished basement? Then the attic, down through the wall might be the best path.

  • B.Greenway

    Des,

    Construction types/materials and locations can all affect what you’ll encounter when you start trying to retro-fit wiring into an existing home. All I can really say in the space I have here, is to be sure what’s behind your walls before you start drilling or cutting into them.

    Preparation is key, determine if you have sway braces or not, use the construction of your home to your advantage, does it have an unfinished basement? If so bringing the wires up from the basement might be the best option, have a finished basement? Then the attic, down through the wall might be the best path.

  • des

    QUESTION regarding the ability of “sneaking” the wiring in and around through established walls … do you have any suggestions/tools that can you can recommend so I can get the power outlet in similar location to where you placed yours? Thanks in advance!

    Des

  • des

    QUESTION regarding the ability of “sneaking” the wiring in and around through established walls … do you have any suggestions/tools that can you can recommend so I can get the power outlet in similar location to where you placed yours? Thanks in advance!

    Des

  • Stan

    We want a wall mounted flat screen but would like to have it on a turn-syle table (like they have in the hospitals). Is this possible???

  • Stan

    We want a wall mounted flat screen but would like to have it on a turn-syle table (like they have in the hospitals). Is this possible???

  • B.Greenway

    Hi Bryan,

    It’s a OmniMount. medium size, no tilt.

  • B.Greenway

    Hi Bryan,

    It’s a OmniMount. medium size, no tilt.

  • Bryan

    What brand/model mounting bracket did you use? I will also be installing a 42″ Panasonic plasma in a few weeks and am looking for recommendations for mounting. The Panasonic brand mount runs around $300 but on eBay you can find them for sub $100 including shipping.

    Also, where did you get that metal apparatus that the cables are popping out of? It really cleans up the look of the hole in the wall.

    Thanks for the guide! and in good timing too

  • Bryan

    What brand/model mounting bracket did you use? I will also be installing a 42″ Panasonic plasma in a few weeks and am looking for recommendations for mounting. The Panasonic brand mount runs around $300 but on eBay you can find them for sub $100 including shipping.

    Also, where did you get that metal apparatus that the cables are popping out of? It really cleans up the look of the hole in the wall.

    Thanks for the guide! and in good timing too

  • B.Greenway

    Hi Tyler,

    Nope the cables were run the day of the install, no pre-existing cabling was in place.

    The box you see in the photo with the cables hanging out is directly above another wall-box down below the LCD, at the height of an electrical box. This is where I brought out my cables that go to the A/V system.

    I even mentioned how I pulled them down through the wall “We use a fish-tape for these types of wire pulls”.

  • B.Greenway

    Hi Tyler,

    Nope the cables were run the day of the install, no pre-existing cabling was in place.

    The box you see in the photo with the cables hanging out is directly above another wall-box down below the LCD, at the height of an electrical box. This is where I brought out my cables that go to the A/V system.

    I even mentioned how I pulled them down through the wall “We use a fish-tape for these types of wire pulls”.

  • TylerDurden

    You did not show alot of what you did with the cabling. Did you have preinstalled cabling and wall outlets to the components (receiver, amp, dvd players)? Where is the preparation?

    My biggest challenge is all the cables behind the plasma.

  • TylerDurden

    You did not show alot of what you did with the cabling. Did you have preinstalled cabling and wall outlets to the components (receiver, amp, dvd players)? Where is the preparation?

    My biggest challenge is all the cables behind the plasma.

  • B.Greenway

    Hi Brian,

    You know I’ve seen that posted in several places as well. All I can say is how is gas (plasma) susceptible to tilt? I readily admit I’m not an engineer and might be missing something but it does seem odd.

    On the other side of the coin, many plasma’s are shipped with a shock/drop sensor affixed to the outside of the box that could easily be confused with a ‘tilt’ warning, maybe this is where it comes from.

    But to answer your question more directly, In the 10+ years that we’ve dealt with plasmas, no distributor or manufacturer’s rep has ever said “don’t tilt that” to us while watching us load one up.

  • B.Greenway

    Hi Brian,

    You know I’ve seen that posted in several places as well. All I can say is how is gas (plasma) susceptible to tilt? I readily admit I’m not an engineer and might be missing something but it does seem odd.

    On the other side of the coin, many plasma’s are shipped with a shock/drop sensor affixed to the outside of the box that could easily be confused with a ‘tilt’ warning, maybe this is where it comes from.

    But to answer your question more directly, In the 10+ years that we’ve dealt with plasmas, no distributor or manufacturer’s rep has ever said “don’t tilt that” to us while watching us load one up.

  • Brian Hoyt

    I have heard from several (semi-questionable) sources that tipping a plasma too far off a vertical axis will damage it. Not in permanent mounting fashion, but in shipping and other respects. Can you confirm or deny this at all. I find it hard to believe but I keep hearing it.

  • Brian Hoyt

    I have heard from several (semi-questionable) sources that tipping a plasma too far off a vertical axis will damage it. Not in permanent mounting fashion, but in shipping and other respects. Can you confirm or deny this at all. I find it hard to believe but I keep hearing it.