1080p Confusion

July 10, 2006

SINOCES 2006Ah nothing like a little disinformation to start your day, or even worse during your visit to the 2006 China International Consumer Electronics Show (SINOCES). According to TWICE contributor Greg Tarr, that’s exactly what many visitors to SINOCES 2006 experienced.

Everyone knows 1080p is the current ‘belle of the ball’ in consumer electronics, even if they don’t know exactly what it means. Well it seems as if some of the exhibitors at SINOCES put this to the test by labeling 4:3 LCD’s as small as 17” as “1,080p”.

“In some cases, TV makers were apparently introducing actual 1,080p products, but the capability was hard to discern among a number of seemingly lesser resolution products that all carried a 1,080p badge.”

I have to wonder just how gullible these exhibitors thought the attendees were, I mean its one thing to (intentionally or unintentionally) blur the difference between 1080p “compatible” and capable, but quite another to misguide the very retailers/distributors you intend to do business with.

As unfortunate as the recent Hitachi and Pioneer mischaracterizations were, accepting 1080p signal inputs on 1366×768 (or similar) panels and then down scaling to 1024×768, may indeed be a worthwhile *feature for some end users. However, trying to pass off a 17”, 4:3 LCD as 1080p makes about as much sense as the tooth fairy, wait a minute I can actually see the logic behind the tooth fairy, strike that metaphor.

Now I don’t want to paint the exhibitors at SINOCES 2006 as huckster snake-oil salesmen bent on deceiving the world, in all seriousness we all need to do a better job at defining what “true” HD or full 1080p means. All of this begs the question, if manufacturers are being ambiguous as to the actual resolution of their products, how are consumers supposed to make heads or tails of it?

Just for the record folks, 1080p proper denotes 1080 lines of vertical resolution (1920 horizontal) progressively scanned. That’s scanned not scammed. When purchasing a new HDTV or display find out the panels/projectors actual native display resolution before discussing anything else, you’ll need that information to make the best comparative purchase possible.

(*) while I don’t subscribe to this school of thought, I wouldn’t begrudge anyone who does.



Posted by Bryan Greenway | | Filed Under Trade Shows


Comments

  • B.Greenway

    Hi DP,

    As your display is 1280×720 (720p) you’ll be limited to a final display resolution of 720p or 480p/i. You may want to experiment with both 1080i and 720p output from the player however, as your display may offer better de-interlacing than the DVD player.

    Unfortunately up-conversion can’t be accomplished over component cables with that particular player. You’ll need to use an HDMI cable to accomplish this.

    As to verifying what resolution the television is displaying, I can’t say as I’m overly familiar with that particular model, but most Samsungs (If I remember correctly) have some ability from the remote to display the current resolution. Try “display” or similar option from the menu.

    Hope that helps.

  • B.Greenway

    Hi DP,

    As your display is 1280×720 (720p) you’ll be limited to a final display resolution of 720p or 480p/i. You may want to experiment with both 1080i and 720p output from the player however, as your display may offer better de-interlacing than the DVD player.

    Unfortunately up-conversion can’t be accomplished over component cables with that particular player. You’ll need to use an HDMI cable to accomplish this.

    As to verifying what resolution the television is displaying, I can’t say as I’m overly familiar with that particular model, but most Samsungs (If I remember correctly) have some ability from the remote to display the current resolution. Try “display” or similar option from the menu.

    Hope that helps.

  • dp

    For those of us that are ‘uninformed’, how can one legitimately tell the output resolution that something is being displayed at? For example, my wife and I recently purchased a Samsung HL-R6167W Television, and this past weekend purchased a Samsung DVD-HD860 DVD player.

    We’ve hooked up component cables, but neither one of us can ‘really’ tell a difference between the display. At least if I saw something that said ‘TV outputting at 1080i’, or something like that, I’d feel better…

  • http://blog.dp.cx dp

    For those of us that are ‘uninformed’, how can one legitimately tell the output resolution that something is being displayed at? For example, my wife and I recently purchased a Samsung HL-R6167W Television, and this past weekend purchased a Samsung DVD-HD860 DVD player.

    We’ve hooked up component cables, but neither one of us can ‘really’ tell a difference between the display. At least if I saw something that said ‘TV outputting at 1080i’, or something like that, I’d feel better…