Sony’s Blu-ray Player Delayed Yet Again

October 19, 2006

Blu-raySony’s BDP-S1 has been delayed, again, three times to be exact. (at least that’s my count) Originally scheduled for release on August 15th the player was then bumped back to October 25th and now SonyStyle.com states “Targeted Availability: On or about December 4, 2006”.

What is it about this player that’s causing the delays? Could it be the blue laser diode shortages caused by Sony gobbling up every blue laser diode they can get their hands on for the PS3? Well according to Andy Parsons of Pioneer “player manufacturers are unlikely to be affected by a blue diode shortage because they are manufacturing far fewer units compared to the millions of PS3s Sony is producing.”

So that must not be it… or maybe it is, as Pioneer’s oft delayed BDP-HD1 Blu-ray player is rumored to have been postponed until January, although select dealers are expecting demo units to arrive shortly. This would seem to indicate the player is complete but a shortage of some key-part is holding up mass production.

So it looks like Samsungs’ BD-P1000 and Panasonic’s DMP-BD10 ($1299) may very well remain the only stand-alone Blu-ray players available throughout the holiday season 2006. Philips and Sharp announced players for the “third quarter of 2006” and “fourth quarter 2006” respectively, but we’ve yet to see any firm launch dates for either of those players.

–Update– Jason Unger of Electronic House sends word that according to a Sony spokesmen, the BDP-S1 was delayed “because of a software problem inside the hardware of the unit”.



Posted by Bryan Greenway | | Filed Under Blu-ray


Comments

  • Gordon Lee

    The problem is software. The BD spec is over 4000 pages describing home networking, DVD playback, BD playback, a Java runtime, a HDMV runtime, and encryption. It is the most complicated piece of software ever written for a set top box.

    Everything BD does using HDMV has to be supported again using the Java runtime, and again using the home networking runtime, so it's like 3 products in the same box.

    In addition, all 4000+ pages of the spec have to be implemented perfectly or no studio will release on the format. Pioneer/Sony is the stage on which the studios depend for a good impression. If the player malfunctions, the studios could lose a lot of money.

    Rest assured, the software is in better shape than it's ever been. Most users wouldn't know the difference if they used a version from 2 weeks ago or the version that's going to China for packaging.

  • Gordon Lee

    The problem is software. The BD spec is over 4000 pages describing home networking, DVD playback, BD playback, a Java runtime, a HDMV runtime, and encryption. It is the most complicated piece of software ever written for a set top box.

    Everything BD does using HDMV has to be supported again using the Java runtime, and again using the home networking runtime, so it’s like 3 products in the same box.

    In addition, all 4000+ pages of the spec have to be implemented perfectly or no studio will release on the format. Pioneer/Sony is the stage on which the studios depend for a good impression. If the player malfunctions, the studios could lose a lot of money.

    Rest assured, the software is in better shape than it’s ever been. Most users wouldn’t know the difference if they used a version from 2 weeks ago or the version that’s going to China for packaging.