Mitsubishi’s 3D TV

March 7, 2007

3D TVWe’ve spoken about 3D TV/Home Theater here before on occasion, and even though I’m not sufficiently convinced this is even something we’ll I’ll want, much less see in the next 10-15 years, it is interesting to follow the research and development end of things. Mitsubishi Electronics Research Labs have been quietly perfecting the technology of 3D TV but not just any old 3D TV, the kind that doesn’t require those ridiculous glasses.

The 3D technology can work with regular TV but according to Mitsubishi, their prototype 3D TV would offer a “richer, more immersive experience than regular TV”, and again, most importantly without those silly glasses. Mitsubishi envisions one or two specialty channels (possibly even a premium subscription channel early on) providing the 3D content and then others catching on, if the consumer demand is there.

Currently the system appears limited to a resolution of 1024×768 but of course as with any research and development the potential for increased resolution is always on the horizon. The system is further described as using “high-resolution (1024×768) stereoscopic color images for multiple viewpoints” with “scalable architecture to manage the high computation and bandwidth demands”.

“In our system image acquisition consists of an array of hardware-synchronized cameras that capture multiple views of the scene. In order to deal with the high processing and bandwidth requirements, the system uses a fully distributed architecture with clusters of PC’s.

A multi-projector 3D display with horizontal parallax achieves large, high-resolution output images. The system is scalable in the number of acquired, transmitted, and displayed real-time video streams.”

Mitsubishi has implemented the 3D systems with rear-projection and front-projection lenticular screens. Ok I have to admit I had to go and find out what “lenticular” meant. According to this Wiki entry “A lenticular lens is a single convex lens that magnifies light through a prism effect,” which would seem to give us a clue as to how their by-passing the 3D glasses.



Posted by Bryan Greenway | | Filed Under 3D Display Technology


Comments

  • kelsci

    I was at a New York boat show in the late 1960s. At a table, there was a party with a 8mm Bell and Howell projector, a film in that projector and a small screen. That party aimed the projector through what seemed to be a prism glass. On the screen, I witnessed a 3-D picture without wearing those “glasses”. The only thing I found in looking at the movie was that it was very tiring and fatiguing to look at it; the image itself took on a kind of less than subliminal waxiness or glassiness.

  • kelsci

    I was at a New York boat show in the late 1960s. At a table, there was a party with a 8mm Bell and Howell projector, a film in that projector and a small screen. That party aimed the projector through what seemed to be a prism glass. On the screen, I witnessed a 3-D picture without wearing those “glasses”. The only thing I found in looking at the movie was that it was very tiring and fatiguing to look at it; the image itself took on a kind of less than subliminal waxiness or glassiness.