iSky: A New Twist on Star Field Ceilings

July 13, 2007

iSky Ceiling

If you’ve ever researched just what goes into installing a fiber-optic, star field ceiling for your home theater, you’ve likely discovered that while the end result is often spectacular, that result doesn’t come without considerable planning and effort. The guys over at iSky panels want to change that; have changed that would be more accurate.

The iSky star field panel system consist of 2×2’ panels (other sizes available) with integrated low-voltage LED’s, illuminating fiber optic strands. The panels can be linked together to power one another and mounted flush (below the surface of the ceiling) making a do-it-yourself installation much more feasible than typical fiber optic systems. Thus far typical fiber optic ceiling installations consist of a separate illuminator and individual fiber optic strands punched through larger, bulky tiles and or the sheetrock itself.

While iSky’s surface anchor system does simplify the installation method for sheetrock ceilings to some degree, the tile for tile drop-in replacements for acoustic ceilings couldn’t be simpler to install. Well that is unless the iSky guys came out and did it for you. Pop out all your existing tiles, paint your ceiling tile grid black and from there it’s basically a paint by numbers exercise.

We currently use two different “star ceiling” systems but the iSky system certainly produces the more intense effect of the two. Below are a few images of an iSky panel in detail and illuminated with the lights dimmed. (Note: the panel pictured is a dealer demonstrator, the actual panels are larger).

iSky Panels



Posted by Bryan Greenway | | Filed Under Home Theater Construction, Home Theater Design


Comments

  • ryan27

    how much do they cost per panel

  • ryan27

    how much do they cost per panel

  • Beachking

    Just a clarification, In 25 years in the acoustic business, I have data to support that the NRC value for the 2 inch fiberglass insuation used for these pre made panels, is Less than 1. More like .75 to .89.Actually there is no such thing as 100% absorption. Owens Corning has a claim that one of their products has 1.05 NRC, and this would be debatable with acuistitions and engineers.It is probably the closest to 100%.I have found and used a company that has current information and knowledge on acoustics. SoundNice.net They have proved very helpful and friendly.

  • John Caldwell

    It should be noted that the iSky Panels come in three types — drop in ceiling (24×24″) and in surface mount (24, 30 and 48″ square) and cloud mount (24, 30 and 48″ square.) Becasue they are 2″ thick of 6 lB. fiberglass and Class A fire rated, they have excellent acoustical properties (greater than 1 NRC) and can therefore also be used on walls as an excellent acoustic absorber to tame nasty first reflections in a theater. Good listening!

  • John Caldwell

    It should be noted that the iSky Panels come in three types — drop in ceiling (24×24″) and in surface mount (24, 30 and 48″ square) and cloud mount (24, 30 and 48″ square.) Becasue they are 2″ thick of 6 lB. fiberglass and Class A fire rated, they have excellent acoustical properties (greater than 1 NRC) and can therefore also be used on walls as an excellent acoustic absorber to tame nasty first reflections in a theater. Good listening!